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Do you want to score more goals next season? It's up to YOU!

5,000 Puck Challenge

By tom gullen, 07/05/18, 10:45AM CDT

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Winnetka Hockey Club

5000 Puck Challenge

PROGRAM OVERVIEW

The Winnetka Hockey Club is pleased to present the 5000 Puck Challenge for our members. The program was created and being used by programs throughout the U.S. and Canada as a development opportunity for hockey players to develop their shooting & scoring skills at home ( at no or little cost!).

There is evidence to show that daily micro-practices are effective and often superior to longer practice sessions once or twice a week. When you practice a little each day, skills do not erode. In fact, they consolidate. It is like a bank account earning compound interest: a virtuous spiral where skill accrues quickly.

So, how well do you think your shot would improve if you were to take 5000 shots over a 10-week period?

Think it cannot be done? Think again! We have created a plan for players of all ages and abilities to follow over 10 weeks to accomplish this goal.

GOAL: Increase shot speed, quickness and accuracy
The Plan: Shoot 5000 pucks in 10 weeks
Weekly Goal: 500 shots per week
Daily Goal: 100 shots per day (5 days per week)
Dates: June 15– September 15, 2018

Signed tracking form due September 18th, 2018

ALL PLAYERS THAT COMPLETE THE 5000 PUCK CHALLENGE WILL receive a WHC Puck Challege SHIRT With the three players shooting the most receiving a $100 gift card to Home Ice

 

GETTING STARTED | WHAT YOU NEED

  • A regulation size net (Street hockey, or ice hockey, even drawn on a concrete wall, or even a garage door J
  • Shooter tutor or targets (Can be made out of plywood or purchased)
  • Shooting surface (concrete floor, driveway, 3'x3' heavy plastic sheet)
  • 10-100 pucks
  • Hockey gloves
  • Stick (should be a few inches shorter than the one used on the ice as player will not be wearing skates)
  • Players must follow the directions for each week and meet the minimum number of shots required for that week.
  • If player cannot hit the upper corner of the net, they can shoot to the lower corner or the middle level of the net until they can hit the upper corner. Form and mechanics are more important than accuracy at the top of the net.
 

CREATING A DAILY PRACTICE ROUTINE

  • Get into a routine. Choose a time when you can practice at the same time every day. Plan for days that you can’t practice. Have a dedicated place to shoot.
  • Be accountable – Do what you can without technique breaking down or losing your focus – don’t just go through the motions. Break your workout into smaller chunks - for example, do half the workout early in the day and finish the rest later on that day
  • Get 20 pucks and shoot 5 sets of 20 for 100 pucks in a day. This should take about 20 minutes given no distractions.
 

TRACKING YOUR PROGRESS

  • Players must track your shots on the 5000 Puck Challenge Tracking Sheet (Download at the Bottom of the Page).
  • The challenge begins June 15 and ends September 15.
  • Parents are required to sign-off on the number of shots completed each day.
 

WEEKLY SHOT INSTRUCTIONS FOR MITES AND U8

Get your friends involved, whether they play hockey or not.  It will make it more fun if you do it together.

Mix up the kinds of shots you take. Scoring goals is a combination of strength, quickness, and accuracy. Here’s one possible way to vary your shots.

  • 50 Distance shooting to increase strength and accuracy.
  • Mites should shoot from 15-20 feet out from net,
  • 25 Close in shots to increase quickness and accuracy. Practice both high and low shots.
  • 25 One-time shots again to increase quickness and accuracy. Have partner pass the puck to you from the side or from behind the net and shoot off pass.
  • Or line up 10 or more pucks and shoot them as quickly as possible. Make sure to aim for corners.
  • Combine wrist, snap, and backhand shots. Slap shots are also okay from farther away.

Get in the habit of shooting on regular schedule, and mark your calendar ahead of time to stay on track.

Plan your schedule ahead, vacations, rainy days, or other unplanned interruptions can put you way behind. Build some make-up time in your schedule.

100 shots a day is a good number, but if you are feeling good, keep shooting and get ahead of schedule.

Wear roller blades to make the shots more realistic. Take some shots standing still and take other shots skating in, and practicing moves.

Aim for corners or smaller targets.

The greatest improvement will come from working on your weaknesses. If your wrist shot or backhand is not as strong as you would like, spend extra time on those areas.

 

SHOT DESCRIPTIONS

WRIST SHOT

  • The hand grip is similar to that used for stickhandling. When possible, the lower hand moves slightly down the shaft for greater power.
  • Puck starts at the heel of the blade and moves toward the toe as you sweep. Spin the puck heel to toe.
  • The weight of the player is transferred to the stick and the skate nearest the puck by flexing the trunk laterally.
  • The grip tightens and the puck is propelled with a snap of the wrists. In one motion, the top hand snaps forward then back towards the body while the wrist is extended. The bottom wrist flexes and whips the stick through towards the target.
  • Front foot points towards target and the follow-through will dictate the height and accuracy of the shot.
  • Eyes should always be on the target, not on the puck.

WRIST SHOTS – BALANCING ON ONE FOOT

  • Back foot should be elevated on a bench or bucket equal to knee height
  • All weight should be on front foot and extra snap of the wrists will help generate more power to the net.
  • Eyes should always be on the target, not on the puck

BACKHAND SHOT

  • The backhand shot is maybe the most difficult for a goalie to save, and probably the most difficult to master.
  • The hand grip is similar to that used for stickhandling. When possible, the lower hand moves slightly down the shaft for greater power.
  • Puck starts at the heel of the blade and moves toward the toe as you sweep. Spin the puck heel to toe.
  • Transfer body weight from back foot to front foot and the puck is released with a quick snap of the wrists while turning the blade upward. The longer the follow through, the higher the shot.

SNAP SHOT

  • The hands are usually held slightly wider than in the stickhandling position.
  • The stick blade is drawn behind the puck at a distance and height dictated by the time available and the distance of the target. The blade should never go higher than the hip.
  • The stick should meet the ice approx. 1 inch behind the puck.
  • The grip tightens and the wrists are usually locked at the moment of impact.
  • Front foot points towards target and the follow-through will dictate the height and accuracy of the shot.
  • Eyes should always be on the target, not on the puck

DRAG & SHOOT

  • This drill includes a set-up move prior to the shot changing the angle of the shot and creating more speed on the shot
  • Hands are extended away from the body with hands close together
  • Pull the puck towards the body and slide bottom hand down stick slightly wider than in the stickhandling position.
  • In one motion, the top hand snaps forward then back towards the body while the wrist is extended. The bottom wrist flexes and whips the stick through towards the target.
  • Front foot points towards target and the follow-through will dictate the height and accuracy of the shot.
  • Eyes should always be on the target, not on the puck

SLAP SHOT

  • The hands are spaced wider on the shaft of the stick than during normal stick handling grip.
  • The puck is close to the body, centered between the legs.
  • After a quick look at the target, the eyes remain fixed on the puck.
  • The player is sideways to the target, bending over the puck and transferring one’s weight from the back leg, to the stick, to the front leg.
  • Wrists are locked and held firmly as the stick comes into contact with the ice, slightly behind the puck (½” to 1”).
  • As you hit through the puck, snap your wrists. Bottom thumb down and top palm up to ceiling. The harder the snap of the wrist the hard the shot will be.
  • Follow-through will dictate the height and accuracy of the shot.

STICKHANDLE & QUICK RELEASE

  • This drill includes a set-up move prior to the shot reinforcing quick hands and quick release
  • Player executes one quick stickhandle and quickly snaps pucks on goal
  • Similar to the Wrist Shot and Snap Shot, the grip tightens and the puck is propelled with a snap of the wrists. In one motion, the top hand snaps forward then back towards the body while the wrist is extended. The bottom wrist flexes and whips the stick through towards the target.
  • Puck is shot from in front of the players body meaning this shot will not have as much power but if executed properly will not allow goalie time to set-up for shot
 

REMEMBER:

  • Build a foundation of technique skills
  • Be consistent/accountable
  • Increase proficiency & confidence
  • Have fun building your skills!